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View Full Version : Announcing the release of MemoryScape 3.0



Chris-TotalView-Tech
08-21-2009, 01:27 PM
MemoryScape 3.0

The biggest new feature is that MemoryScape 3.0 introduces support for detecting memory bounds errors at the point in the program where they occur. This functionality called "Red Zones" always has low runtime performance overhead and includes the ability to precisely target specific allocations so that it can be applied with very low memory space overhead.

MemoryScape 3.0 also includes the ability to launch the debugger interface.

Here are the full list of new features in this release:

* Interoperability with TotalView
You can launch the TotalView product from within a MemoryScape session and you can launch MemoryScape from within a TotalView session.

* Red Zones instant array bounds detection for Linux
Red zones protect your allocated memory in a way that MemoryScape can immediately detect when your program tries to access beyond the allocations bounds.

MemoryScape uses red zones to detect access violations both before and after the bounds of your allocated memory. It can also detect when your program accesses memory which has been deallocated. MemoryScape will stop your programs execution and raise an event alerting you to the illegal access. You will be able to see exactly where your code over stepped the bounds. You have full control over how and when Red Zones are applied to your allocated memory. You can restrict red zones to allocations in several user defined size ranges and you can easily turn red zones on and off at any time during your programs execution.

* Hoard Low Memory Detection

When you ask MemoryScape to hoard deallocated memory, you may run the risk of running out of available memory earlier than expected. MemoryScape now has the capability to reduce this risk and alert you when you are at risk.

ReplayEngine 1.5 and TotalView 8.7 were also released today. They introduce the ability to introduces the ability to reverse debug with long-running codes and to do heterogenous debugging.


Sincerely,
Chris Gottbrath